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Film Study

Essential Questions:
1) What is film study?
2) Why is film important as a medium?
2) What can film do/not do as compared to other mediums?

1) What is the film saying? (content)
2) How is the film saying it? (form)
3) How well is the film saying it through its form? (analysis)

Spring 2016

5/2
Select Film Short of the Week. Discuss in groups of three.

4/25
Begin chapter 4, cinematography
Werner Herzog: Encounters at the End of the World.

4/18-22
vacation

4/11--15
Raging Bull.
Conference call with Cathy Moriarty
Finish Herzog film
Introduce Raging Bull

4/8
Continue mise-en-scene
with Werner Herzog film.
From One Second to the Next

4/7
Composing the frame.
balance, symmetry, negative space, 27 cubic boxes..
Begin Werner Herzog short documentary.

4/6
Composing the frame.
Rule of thirds with phones.
Framing techniques.

4/5
Open and closed framing.
On screen and off screen space.
The Youth in Us
The Rule of Thirds.

4/1
Present projects.
Quiz chapter 2.

3/31, 30
Present projects.
Course video guide.


3/28
Work with film project.
Christopher Nolan analysis

3/24, 5
Finish Memento.

3/22
A=Socratic seminar

3/21
Socratic seminar.

3/18
Substitute.
Students prepare for film director seminar.


3/17
Memento viewing with questions and comments using terms from chapter two (form and narrative).

3/16
Memento viewing with questions and comments using terms from chapter two (form and narrative).

3/15
Form.

3/14
Film project due 3/29
Letter format example

3/11
Audio: "Memento Mori"
Memento. questions/answers/terms from chapter 2

3/10
suspense/surprise.
Hitchcock suspense.

3/8
C=film history; submit three films

3/7
C, A=film history: The Story of Film (1)

3/3
A=see c period from earlier
C=story vs. plot
story vs. plot
"Digits"

3/2
A=question 1 from end of chapter (sub)
C=story vs. plot

3/1
A=Finish chapter 1 quiz.
C=Film form
film short "Making it in America"
Remind students of 50 journal entry assignment.

2/29
C=Discuss chapter 2: What is form?
"Principles of Film Form"
Hand-back journals and quiz.

2/26
Film Study
Chapter One Quiz
February 26
(Respond in journal)

Questions for Review:
Using text evidence, answer three of the ten questions on page 52.

Questions for Analysis:
Watch the following film short. Answer questions 1, 3, and 4 on page 53.
Film Short: "The Bull Rider"

2/25
12 journal entries due Friday.
chapter 1 quiz on Friday.
A period: "The Answers"
"Heavyweight"

2/24
Students make experimental film.

2/23
A=camera movement (tilt, pan, dolly or tracking, crane, steadicam, handheld)
"Bartholomew's Song"

C=make film in groups

2/22
Tutorial on: camera distance (proxemics): ELS, LS, FS, MLS, MS, CU, ECU
camera angles: EL, HA, LA, EHA (Bird's Eye), Dutch
Film example: "Spam-ku"

2/19
Film review.
Homework for C (picture of student with film choice)

2/18
Review Casablanca with film clips.

Field Trip 2/17 to Trinity College
Casablanca

2/10
Realism and Formalism
Form and Content
Future Hero

2/9
Movies can depict the world convincingly
Student experiment with perception/film trip to auditorium

2/8
Snow

2/5
Snow

2/4
Film principle 3: the illusion of movement
human perception
Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat
Wes Anderson film

2/3
Continue with principle 2: light.
How does this film use (or not use) light to convey meaning?
Gonzalez 9-11
Penn 9-11

2/2
Select directors for project
Film principle # 2: movies depend on light.
Doodlebug, Olive.

2/1
textbooks
journals
project 1 assigned

1/28
Permission slip.
Wasp.

1/27
Film analysis video/starter
"Passengers" analysis: sound, camera, actors, setting

1/26
course introductions
watch two film shorts and answer select questions.
"Milk and Blood"
"Daybreak"

1/25
Introduce course.
Watch and compare:
"My Mother's Motorcycle"
"Delivery"
Homework:
1) introduction sheet
2) quiz on five principles of film
3) art product based on either "My Mother's Motorcycle" or "Delivery"



2015 (Fall)


Essential Questions:
1) What is film study?
2) Why is film important as a medium?
2) What can film do/not do as compared to other mediums?

1) What is the film saying? (content)
2) How is the film saying it? (form)
3) How well is the film saying it through its form? (analysis)

Exam Review:
Film Study
Final Examination Review
Mr. Bergman

Essential Questions:
1) What is film study?
2) Why is film important as a medium?
2) What can film do/not do as compared to other mediums?

Basic Questions:
1) What is the film saying? (content)
2) How is the film saying it? (form)
3) How well is the film saying it through its form? (analysis)

Please review:
Questions for Analysis from chapter 1-6
Questions for Review from chapters 1-6
Fundamental Principles on page 2.
Terms:
One:
sequence, scenes, persistence of vision, realism, fantasy, verisimilitude, cinematic conventions,
genre, stream of consciousness
Two:
form, content, narrative, diegesis, non-diegesis, story, plot, suspense, surprise, setting, point of view,
Three:
mise-en-scene, composition, onscreen space, offscreen space, open and closed frame, framing, kinesis, chiaroscuro
Four:
cinematography, shot, gaffer, grip, film stock, key light, fill light, back light, deep focus photography,
types of shots: ELS, LS, MLS, MS, CU, ESU
rule of thirds
camera angle: EL, HA, LA, Dutch, Bird’s eye,
camera movement: pan, tilt, tracking, crane, handheld, Steadicam,
Five:
method acting
Six:
cutting, continuity editing, parallel editing, 180 degree rule, fade, dissolve, montage
Films:
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Raging Bull
Memento


1/14
180 degree rule.
Exam Review (see above)

1/13
Editing.
Read first part of chapter 6.
Computer lab: final projects e-mail by Thursday night, 12 midnight.

1/11
Editing basics, chapter 6

1/6
Acting analysis. Read 285-6 from text.
Analyze film.

1/5
Acting. Read introduction to chapter.


12/21
Review 3-act film structure.
Watch examples.
Voiceover project due tomorrow at noon. Please e-mail or share.

12/17
Group work. Film treatment. Roles defined.

12/15
Computer lab for voiceover project. Due 12/22

12/14
Begin 12/22 Cinematography Project in room 63.
See below.


12/11
Finish Diving Bell with 5/5
Introduce film project 2.
Film in Madision; It's a Wonderful Life

12/9-10
Begin to watch and discuss The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

12/8
Introduce project.
Film Study
2nd Quarter Project
Due: December 22 (e-mailed)

Project Title: Cinematography Commentary

Download Youtube Boomtown video of “The Squeeze” episode.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlzUarg-U5Q
Using Windows Live Movie Maker and Sound Recorder, create a fiftenn-minute
cinematography analysis using terms from chapter four. Stop video and make commentary periodically. We do not need 15-minutes of screen time, just 15-minutes of voiceover.

Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5L7ghWg71k

Rubric:

A=15-minutes, uses sophisticated analysis with appropriate terms, relates form to content

B=between 12-15 minutes in length, problems with recording, show some sophisticated analysis

C=between 8-12 minutes in length, major issues with technology, limited analysis

D=poor effort




12/7
Days of Heaven for cinematography. Read text.

12/4
Boomtown, "The Squeeze"
5/5 cinematography

12/2
Read 201 to 206.
Discuss depth and rule of thirds.
Students take pictures and frame using techniques.

12/1
conference call with Cathy Moriarty.
Raging Bull analysis.


11/23
Raging Bull. 5 questions/5 comments

11/20
Director of Photography, pages 180-88
DP tutorial.
Raging Bull, 5/5

11/19
cinematography, Raging Bull analyze

11/18
What is cinematography?
Tutorial, Cinematography 101
Robert Yeoman's work.
Wes Anderson film "
"CASTELLO CAVALCANTI"

11/16
Finish American Film, The Story of Film.

11/13
The Story of Film, chapter 9 (1967-1979)
RB intro.

11/12
Tutorials: setting and expressionism, lighting and familiar image
free write about these.
Watch tutorial of chiaroscuro.
Film short "Chiaroscuro"

11/11
"The Next Part"

11/10
production design
production manager's roles
Analyze film short: "The Youth in Us"

11/6
Listen to "Memento Mori"

11/4
Height framing.
Read 128-135.
Finish Memento (open/closed framing; on screen/offscreen space)

11/3
Mise-en-scene (actors, composition)

11/2
Begin chapter 3, mise-en-scene.
Continue with Memento, setting and lighting. End 1:12.

10/29
Substitute.
Answer five questions at the end of chapter 2.

10/28
Memento (form, sound, editing, narrative); end at 1:02.
Nolan analysis.


10/27
Begin Memento with student generated questions and comments (editing, mise-en-scene, mise-en-shot, sound, narrative structure).

10/26
Sub.
Read text.
Answer chapter 2, questions for review, #4.
Preview Memento, narrative structure.

10/21
Read 76-82 (Narrative)
Make film pitch on 3-second idea.
Watch "Guest" and match narrative structure.
Narrative structure.

10/20
"Sea Devil" with general film questions.

10/19
Read form and patterns.
Return film analysis projects.
Continue with The Story of Film, episode 5 (1939-1953)

10/16
starter: What formal expectations do you have prior to watching a film? sound, cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, narrative
Read pages 63-65.
Watch Mexican short on 9-11.
What is film saying? (content)
How is it saying it? (form)
How well is it saying it? (analysis)


10/15
Begin reading chapter 2 (Form)
Lesson on form with free write and sketch.
Present film analysis projects.

10/13
Film Analysis project due.

10/9
Computer lab for project.

10/8
Validation for cinematography, sound, editing, mise-en-scene
Episode 4, The Story of Film

10/7
Continue film analysis project. Due Friday.
Episode 4 of The Story of Film due Friday.

10/6
Reel Youth Hartford Film Festival introduced.
Continue film analysis project. Due Friday.

10/2
Begin film project by selecting images to analyze.


10/1
Distribute first film project.
Continue with episode 3:


9/30
Manhattan Short Film Festival
Hand back quiz.
Cover camera distance (implied proxemics): ELS, LS, F, ML, M, CU, ECU
camera movement: tilt, pan, dolly, crane, steadicam, handheld
camera angles: EL, LA, HA, EHA (Bird's Eye), Oblique/Dutch
Begin episode 3 of The Story of Film.
1) realists, 2) Lubitch, 3) Paris (impressionism), 4) Germany (expressionism), Dada, Russians

9/29

Quiz

Quiz

Answer 1, 3, 7 from Questions for Review, chapter one

Briefly explain the importance of episodes 1 and 2 of The Story of Film.

Watch Wes Anderson’s “Castello Cavalcanti”. Answer questions 2 and 3 from Questions for Analysis

9/28

Review for chapter one text quiz.

Watch "Future Hero."



9/24
Sound as it relates to Spam-Ku.
Finish episode 2.

9/23
Continue episode two of The Story of Film.

9/22
Watch Goodfellas opening with music.
Welcome guests:
Salvatore Sangiovanni
Sue DiBona

9/21
Introduce guest speakers for Tuesday.
The Villa Studios
5-minutes film school/production
Begin episode two.

9/18
Watch "In God We Trust" and employ selected questions.
Discuss episode one of The Story of Film.
See viewing schedule below.

9/16
Finish episode one: The Story of Film
Distribute screening schedule on Netflix (account required)
The Story of Film due dates.
1.1 Episode 1 - Birth of the Cinema
Due: 9/18
1.2 Episode 2 - The Hollywood Dream
Due: 9/25
1.3 Episode 3 - The Golden Age of World Cinema
Due: 10/2
1.4 Episode 4 - The Arrival of Sound
Due: 10/9
1.5 Episode 5 - Post-War Cinema
Due: 10/16
1.6 Episode 6 - Sex & Melodrama
Due: 10/23
1.7 Episode 7 - European New Wave
Due: 10/30
1.8 Episode 8 - New Directors, New Form
Due: 11/6
1.9 Episode 9 - American Cinema of the 70s
Due: 11/13
1.10 Episode 10 - Movies to Change the World
Due: 11/20
1.11 Episode 11 - The Arrival of Multiplexes and Asian Mainstream
Due: 11/30
1.12 Episode 12 - Fight the Power: Protest in Film
Due: 12/4
1.13 Episode 13 - New Boundaries: World Cinema in Africa, Asia & Latin America
Due: 12/11
1.14 Episode 14 - New American Independents & The Digital Revolution
Due: 12/18
1.15 Episode 15 - Cinema Today and the Future
Due: 1/4


9/15
Answer questions 9 and 10 on page 52: film principle 5.

9/14
Answer question 8 on page 53 for starter (technology)
Begin The Story of Film: An Odyssey (Birth of the Cinema)
notes: lie to tell the truth, act of making us feel like we are there, Casablanca, Record of a Tenement Building, Tax Driver, Carol Reed, Lynch, Luhrmann,
French Connection, Thomas Edison, Eastman, Black Maria, Lyon, Melies, Lumiere, phantom ride, Eisenstein, Sergio Leone, editing, cuts, parallel editing, continuity editing,
Buster Keaton, reverse angle shot, Florence Lawrence, Asta Nielsen, star system, working class, Greta Garbo, Ingrid Bergman, Nickelodeon, Benjamin Christensen, Latham Loop,
180 degree line,Cecil Blount DeMille, Louis Weber, female dominated profession, 1920--15,000 theater nationwide, seen as middle to lower middle class taste, DW Griffith, Lilian Gish, The Birth of a Nation, Eisenstein

9/11
starter: question 5, page 52
Read film principle number 3: persistence of vision, phi phenomenon.
Watch "Arrival of Train" as example.
Read film principle number 4: realism vs. fantasy.
The Lumiere Brothers'
Georges Méliès
Modern day examples: fantasy: Tim Burton
realism: Gus Van Sant

9/9
starter: how does film fool your eyes?
Watch sequence from The Godfather for principle one.
Watch sequence from Do the Right Thing for principle two.
Watch film short from Jonathan Nolan, Doodlebug for first two film principles.
Quiz on first five film principles.

9/8
Hand out syllabus.
Hand out textbook.
Read first few pages.
Copy down five principles of film (quiz on Thursday).
Watch "Keep the Change" and look for manipulation of space and time.

9/4
Film analysis video/starter
"Passengers" analysis: sound; camera angle, movement, distance; shot length, actors

9/3
starter: answer essential questions and post on wall in back.
watch film short: One Man's Lose
content: what is film saying, form: how is film saying it
Listen to Mark Reep story "House by the Sea"
Storyboard story in eight frames.

9/1






























































2015 (spring)
Journal Assignment:
Films Short
Wing Clips
IMDB user comments

3rd Quarter Assignment:
See link to right under film project.

Chapter:
Chapter One (What is a Movie): Questions for Analysis: 3rd Quarter Exam (questions 1-8)
Chapter Two (Form and Narrative): (QFA):
Chapter Three (Mise-en-scene and Design): (QFA):
Chapter Four (Cinematography): (QFA):
Chapter Five (Acting): (QFA):
Chapter Six (Editing): (QFA):
Chapter Seven (Sound): (QFA):

5/11
Long shot
Terence Mallick Days of Heaven sequence

5/8
Rule of thirds

5/7
Review camera angles, proxemics, movement

5/6
Elephant

5/4
Chapter 4: cinematography

4/27
Mise-en-scene.
acting
lighting
set design.

4/24
Briefly introduce 4th quarter project.
Narrative structure.
Nolan describes structure.

4/20
Introduce Memento and nonlinear narrative

4/17
"From the Sky"

4/16
Boomtown as nonlinear narrative.

4/14
short film

4/13
Rosemary Jane

4/1
Chapter 1 quiz
Collect Film Shot Analysis Project
Finish On the Waterfront

3/31
Prepare for quiz
Continue Waterfront

3/30
Spike Jonze "How They Get There" as practice for quiz (questions for analysis on page 53)
Film project examples
Continue with On the Waterfront (car scene)

3/26
chapter 2 surprise vs suspense
Hitchcock on suspense

3/25
On the Waterfront importance
Scorsese on film.

3/24
C: Diegesis/Non-Diegesis
Story/Plot

3/23
See C period

3/20
On the Waterfront viewing

3/19
On the Waterfront viewing

3/18
Introduce On the Waterfront
Ebert review
film trailer
cinematic expectations

3/17
"Yearbook"
form/content

3/16
"Rocks"
realism vs. formalism

3/10
B: see C
C: film form
realism vs. formalism

3/9
B: see C from 3/6
C: Slomo
return all projects


3/6
Item five of basic film principles: "Movies generally result from a highly complex, expensive, and highly collaborative process.:
Film Production Stages
J.J. Abrams: On Filmmaking
Super-8 Mom (2005)

3/5
Movie genre.
short tutorial
main film genres

3/2
Movies Provide An Illusion Of Movement
page 24
tutorial

Movies Can Depict Worlds Convincingly
page 27
realism/Lumiere "Arrival of a Train" (1895) actualites: mini documentaries from everyday life
fantasy/Melies "A Trip to the Moon" magicians' illusions

2/27
Baker's dozen questions
"Milk and Blood"


2/26
Projects due
Presentations

2/25
Sub/chapter 1, 1-5

2/24
class time for project work.

2/23
The Chase
Computer lab for project work

2/20
1/27
Camera (framing, angle, movement)
ELS, LS, FS, ML, MS, CU, ECU
EL, LA, HA, EH (Bird's Eye), Dutch
Tilt, Pan, Dolly, Crane, JibArm, SteadyCam, HH
Camera angles

2/19
Camera movement

2/18
Camera distance


2/10
Five Principles of Film:
1) Movies manipulate space and time in ways that other forms cannot.

Today's clips:

Francis Ford Coppola's
The Godfather
"Baptism and Murder scene"

Charlie Chaplin's
The Gold Rush

Steven Spielberg's
Saving Private Ryan
"opening clip"

film analysis question:
How does this film manipulate time and space.
"Gasman" directed by Lynne Ramsey

2/6
"Spin" by Jamin Winans

2/5
"Heavyweight" by Jesper Quistgaard

2/4
"The Youth in Us" by Josh Leonard

2/3
"Razor's Edge" by Lorenzo Benedick

1/30
Sean Penn's "9-11"











































































Introduce weekly blog [[#|assignment]]:
Reflect upon a film, a discussion, a reading, an activity from the week--either in class or out. Ideas might include using some of the sources on this page: Bordwell blog, New York Times "Anatomy of a Scene," Films Short. Enter a 10-sentence commentary on your personal blog. In addition, cut and paste a commentary from another student and respond to their comments in a 5-sentence reflection. Each are due on Thursday night by midnight. Some computers at Morgan may not allow you to do this unless you use either Google Chrome or Firefox. Your blog is located on this page, simply scroll down and connect. Make sure to date the entry as well as give it some type of title, which will help people determine if it is a subject of interest from them.
Format: Date, Week, Subject
Make sure you identify the writer in whom you respond.



How might different viewers from me, interpret this film differently? Why do they not “see” the same things that I see? How do my life’s experiences filter my understanding of the film? How do the producers of this film represent the antagonist or the protagonist? What do the setting, the clothes, the accents of the actors all communicate about the time period or the way of life of these characters?What role does each character [[#|play]] in communicating values?
Week 11: April 4, read a blog entry or a Reader's Favorite from David Bordwell's site,
about a subject that interests you. Include the title of his blog when you respond. You do not need to respond to another student's this week.
Week 12: April 11: Easy Rider. What are your thoughts about the film thus far?
Week 13: April 18: What movies are you watching? Give your thoughts. Use cinematic language.
Week 14: April 25: Discuss the importance of cinematography. Use film terms from chapter 4. Refer to films you have seen.
Week 15: May 2: What are your initial cinematic impressions of Raging Bull?
Week 16: May 9: Please justify--or not--the inclusion of Raging Bull in the Film Study curriculum. See course description below. Use language from course description in your response.
external image image?pagenumber=30&w=711
Week 17: May 16, no blog assignment
Week 18: May 23: Name two of your favorite film performances. Why were these performances so exceptional? Use imdm.com's external reviews to answer this question.
Week 19: May 30, select any clip from WingClip and analyze mise-en-shot and mise-en-scene.
Week 20: June 6


5/27
Acting both good and bad.
Edit script.

5/19
B: conference call with Cathy Moriarty
Begin acting unit
E: begin acting unit
watch short piece on script formatting

5/16
No B period.
E: conference call with Cathy Moriarty

5/15
Screenplay formatting

5/13
Finish Raging Bull, group discussions

5/12
Raging Bull

5/8
LaMotta as physical transfer to film
Watch Robinson-LaMotta boxing, round 2
Selected terms for end of Act II.
Free Write
Blog due tonight/film scenario.
LaMotta interview

5/7
Ebert review.
[[#|Continue]] film with chosen terms.

5/6
Raging Bull for hubs and satellites

5/5
3 Act Skit
Story Telling
"Writer's Block" film short

5/2
Raging Bull. study guide.
Raging Bull questions.
Watch opening shot and write about cinematic themes.
Collect treatment.

5/1
[[#|Continue]] with Raging Bull (female and male gender roles)
Blog due Thursday night.
Treatment due Friday.

4/30
Raging Bull

4/29
[[#|Continue]] with Raging Bull. Continue with project.

4/28
Blog work. Comment on other student's work.

4/24
E: Camera shot review, camera movement review
Create own shots with camera phones
B: see E yesterday.

4/23
E: starter: composition with rule of thirds
Rule of thirds
8 as example of composition and thirds.

4/22
Rule of thirds.
Watch Bus 44 and apply rule of thirds structure.

4/21
Cinematography unit
Begin video.

4/10
Finish film.

4/9
Continue film. Discuss using binary oppositions.
Write about Cafe scene.

4/8
Read 1969 New York Times review of Easy Rider.

4/7
Create context for film.

4/4
Open and Closed Framing
North by Northwest clip
Continue with Easy Rider.

4/3
Dennis Hopper interview, Making of Easy Rider

4/2
Introduce Easy Rider. See notes below.
Easy Rider (1969)//

Directed by Dennis [[#|Hopper]]
Written by Peter Fonda
Dennis [[#|Hopper]]
Terry Southern
Music by Roger McGuinn
Cinematography László Kovács
Release date: July 14, 1969

Budget $360,000
Box office $41,728,598

Easy Rider is a 1969 American road movie written by Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, and Terry Southern, produced by Fonda and directed by Hopper. It tells the story of two bikers (played by Fonda and Hopper) who travel through the American Southwest and South. The success of Easy Rider helped spark the New Hollywood phase of filmmaking during the early 1970s.
A landmark counterculture film, and a "touchstone for a generation" that "captured the national imagination," Easy Rider explores the societal landscape, issues, and tensions in the United States during the 1960s, such as the rise and fall of the hippie movement, drug use, and communal lifestyle. In Easy Rider real drugs were used in scenes showing the use of marijuana and other substances.

Plot:
The protagonists are two freewheeling hippies: Wyatt (Fonda), nicknamed "Captain America", and Billy (Hopper). Fonda and Hopper said that these characters' names refer to Wyatt Earp and Billy the Kid. Wyatt dresses in American flag-adorned leather (with an Office of the Secretary of Defense Identification Badge affixed to it), while Billy dresses in Native American-style buckskin pants and shirts and a bushman hat. The former is appreciative of help and of others, while the latter is often hostile and leery of outsiders.

Cast:

Peter Fonda – Wyatt, "Captain America"
Dennis [[#|Hopper]] – Billy
Jack Nicholson – George Hanson

Most of the film is shot outside with natural lighting. Hopper said all the outdoor shooting was an intentional choice on his part, because "God is a great gaffer." The production used two five-ton trucks, one for the equipment and one for the motorcycles, with the cast and crew in a motor home. One of the locations was Monument Valley.


Easy Rider’s style — the jump cuts, time shifts, flash forwards, flashbacks, jerky hand-held cameras, fractured narrative and improvised acting — can be seen as a cinematic translation of the psychedelic experience.

Motorcycles as the new Western transport (horses)
Questions:
What is the American dream?
Who defines it?
What role the “road” plays in our understanding of self?
Binary oppositions:
Road/Home
Movement/Static
Friend/Foe
Motorcycle/Horse
New American/Old America
1960’s/1950’s America
Country/City
Horizontal/Vertical
Western/Eastern
Morning/Night
Agriculture/Industry

Music
The movie's "groundbreaking" soundtrack featured The Band, The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Steppenwolf.
Bob Dylan was asked to contribute music, but was reluctant to use his own recording of "It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)", so a version performed by Byrds frontman Roger McGuinn was used, instead. Also, instead of writing an entirely new song for the film, Dylan simply wrote out the first verse of “Ballad of Easy Rider” and told the filmmakers, “Give this to McGuinn, he’ll know what to do with it.” McGuinn completed the song and performed it in the film.

4/1
Answer two essential questions using writing rubric.

3/31
Watch mise-en-scene introduction.
Watch setting and expressionism tutorial
Watch Lighting and Familiar Image tutorial.
Review three essential questions. Will respond--using handwritten notes from journal--on Tuesday to all three.

3/27
Present film projects.
Discuss five quotes from On the Waterfront.

3/26
Present film projects.

3/25
B: finish film and discuss using questions for analysis
E: discuss questions for analysis
Project due Wednesday

3/24
B: computer time for project
E: finish film and begin discussing questions for analysis


3/21
Scorsese plot vs story, plot vs character driven.
Project due Wednesday.

3/20
Scorsesee influence of On the Waterfront
Blog due Thursday night (week 9)

3/19
Story, plot, screen duration.
summary, real, stretch relationships.
OTW (Charlie with Johnny, Terry in cab with Charley)

3/18
Computer time for project

3/17
Introduce binary oppositions (high/low; dark/light; male;female; civilized/uncivilized; spiritual/secular)
Continue viewing film with these in mind.
Film project due March 26.

3/14
Spike Lee interview, Brando at Academy
Continue 10 minutes On the Waterfront (Edie, Terry at tavern; Terry meets Johnny Friendly about church meeting)

3/13
Continue with On the Waterfront and terms from chapter 2.
Blog 8 due tonight.

3/12
Starter: Watch interview with Elia Kazan and respond.
Begin discussing narrative questions with class (1-10).
Blog due Thursday evening.

3/11
Starter: Read 1954 film review of On the Waterfront.
Continue watching next ten minutes of film.
Pose questions and written responses.
Notes:
Character: major/minor
dynamic/static
flat/round
stock


3/10
Read Ebert film review of On the Waterfront
Prepare students for film.
Watch first 10 minutes, noting mise-en-scene.

3/7
Watch interview with Jimmy Driscoll about "The Fence"
B: to computer lab for: 1) update week seven blog, bold film terms, make sure ten line, label
2) post 8 project ideas
3) begin director research using iconn.org, indb.com (external and user reviews)
cut and paste three pieces of text about director style

3/6
Substitute

Show "The Fence" to class. Film should be in its case either on student desk or on front board.
In journal, have students write eight questions for the director who will visit on Friday.
Do not hand in journal after class. Remind students of evening's blog assignment.

3/5
B: story vs plot. see below.
E: point of view tutorial
"Razor's Edge"
"By using point of view (form), "Razor's Edge" explores(content)_"

3/4
Discuss story vs plot.
No B period.

3/3
B: see E from 2/28
E: computer lab to explore project ideas.

2/28
How to determine film quality. The Onion.
Discuss suspense vs. surprise, Hitchcock interview, plot vs. story.
Create suspense/surprise skits.
B: see E from 2/27

2/27
B: see E from 2/26
E: Review film terms from yesterday.
Watch "Spin" and discuss as either mise-en-scene or mise-en-shot.

2/26
E: starter: Listen to Guy Clark's "LA Freeway" and decide how to film a 5-minute piece (mise-en-scene, mise-en-shot)
Distribute Film Study
List of terms to know and review:
Content: what film says
Form: how film says it
Significant Form: separate parts put together to give higher level of visual meaning
Internal Perspective: to film itself (Poetic)
External Perspective: historical and social context ( Contextualized)
Mise-en-scene: (putting on stage)—set design, lighting, character movement
Mise-en-shot: camera position, camera movement, shot scale, duration of single shot, editing
B period: see E from 2/25

2/25
Discuss form vs. content.


2/24
[[#|Listen]] to Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"
Watch 1969 film version

2/14
Salim Baba for starter: documentary films from chapter one.

2/13
Snow Day.

2/12
The Big Charade
B: Listen to 2-minute talk about interest in cimema.
Read Tom Hazuka's "Utilitiarianism" and decide how to film it with eight shots.
E: Week Four blog entry.

2/11
B: Chubbchubbs, read pages 31, 46-47, answer question 6 for Questions for Analysis
Discuss three course essential questions.
E: Watch Bartholomew's Song and answer question 1 in Questions for Analysis

2/10
Teacher substitute.
Answer questions 8, 9, 10 on page 53.

2/7
Watch Chubbchubbs and answer question 6 on page 53.
Storyboard Hazuka's "Utilitarianism" in 8 shots with sound, shot type, shot length, mise-en-scene.

2/6
B: See E from 2/4
E: Continue with The Story of Film (to 43 minutes)

2/5
Snow Day

2/4
B: See E and review Questions for Analysis
E: Film short "The Stairway" by Alex Torterotot

2/3
Snow Day

1/31
E: Look at "Questions for Analysis" while watching "Wasp"
B: No class

1/30
Realism vs. Fantasy
Watch clips from:
Lumiere Brothers
Georges Méliès.
The Story of Film: an Odyssey: 1895

1/29
Watch "Gasman" and explore: camera angle, camera distance, camera movement, lighting. Free write and discuss.
Free write music: 1994 - __Talking Timbuktu__ Ali Ibrahim “Farka” Touré (with Ry Cooder)

1/28
Lighting. Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing opening sequence
Ratio: key, fill, back, 3-point lighting
Quality: direct, diffused
Direction: frontal, back, Halloween,

1/27
Camera (framing, angle, movement)
ELS, LS, FS, ML, MS, CU, ECU
EL, LA, HA, EH (Bird's Eye), Dutch
Tilt, Pan, Dolly, Crane, JibArm, SteadyCam, HH
Spam-Ku for [[#|examples]] of proxemics, movement and angle.

1/24
Film manipulates both time and space.
[[#|View]] clip of Chaplin's //The Gold Rush// as example of space manipulation
[[#|View]] clip of Coppola's //The Godfather// as example of time manipulation.
Practice sketch in which students storyboard an example of time and space change.

1/23



B: see yesterday. Blog due tonight.
E: starter: "The Escape" by Andre Surya
Begin weekely blog entry in computer lab.
Syllabus and textbooks distributed.

1/22
No B period.
E: LXIV by Damian Livesey
Formal analysis; Juno
Field trip to office for four panel storyboard.

1/21
Watch Spike Jonze "How They Get There" and analyze.
Remind to sign Wiki.
Remind to have read Bordwell article.
Remind to watch film by chosen director.

1/17
Starter: How do our film tastes evolve with age?
Watch The Youth in Us. Write about, discuss.
Collect journals.
Homework: Sign up for Wiki.
Watch film by selected director (Netflix, Amazon, Youtube, RedBox, Town Library)

1/16
Course Introduction
Watch Senn Penn 9-11 film. Free write.
Distribute journals
Three questions to consider:
What is this film saying? (content)
How is the film saying it? (form)
How well is it saying it?
Homework:
1) Good films front cover; bad films back cover
2) e-mail teacher a director to study at 3pm or after
3) In journal, write titles of three favorite films and respond in two journal pages as to why.
4) Read David Bordwell blog and be ready to discuss for Friday.

























































2013
Course:
Journals (25%)
Projects (25%)
Test, Quiz (25%)
Other: participation, homework, classwork, starters (25%)

Chapter: Quiz:
One: What is a Movie?
Two: Form and Narrative
Three: Mise-en-scene
Four: Cinematography
Five: Acting
Six: Editing
Seven: Sound
Eight: Writing about Film

FILM STUDY
May 23-27
Begin Wes Anderson
Begin Editing from chapter 6

May 13-20
Discuss acting (chapter 5).
Continue Memento with acting as subject.
Question: How do we discuss film?

May 10
Continue Memento---student chosen categories.

May 9
Look at Mise-en-shot with Memento viewing.

May 8
Continue to compare short story to film. Discuss narrative structure.

May 7
[[#|Listen]] to Jonathan Nolan's "Memento Mori"
Compare to film Memento.
Continue viewing using student-generated questions

May 6
Begin Memento.

May 3
Watch Without a Trace and answer question regarding camera point of [[#|view]]

May 2
Watch cut from The Birds (Hitchcock) that explores camera POV


April 22-May 1
Easy Rider
Use student generated questions to explore film from various historical and cultural contexts.

4/9
(due May 17)

4/8
Last day before projects due: script, six learning objectives, film and discussion.
Chapter 4 on-line quiz due Thursday night (cinematography)

4/3-5
.

4/2
Introduce Easy Rider.

Lighting:
Ratio: high key lighting, low key lighting
Quality: direct, diffused
Direction: back, front, halloween
key, fill, back, kicker, 3-point lighting

4/1
Finish On the Waterfront. Discuss ending and imporant quotes.

3/28
Chapter 3 on-line quiz due tonight. Finish On the Waterfront. Discuss student generated questions.

3/27
Student blogs should be entered. Continue with Waterfront using terms from chapter 3, mise-en-scene.

3/26
Please record your three questions and three comments from today's class,
using terms from chapter 3--mise-en-scene. Answer one of your questions
with a minimum of eight sentences and upload all of it on your student
blog link. Try a few different computers if need be.

http://filmstudy2013.wikispaces.com/

3/25
Sub. Read chapter three and answer three questions at end of the chapter.

3/22
Answer chapter question as starter. Discuss project ideas. Continue with Waterfront. Student generated questions and coments.

3/20-21
Listen to Denis Johnson's "Emergency." How would this translate to film?

3/18
B, C=Check David Bordwell article. Watch famous scene from On the Waterfront between two brothers.

3/15
Watch On the Waterfront with different critical perspective. Students assigned role to watch through.
Quiz chapter two due Thursday night.

3/13
D=Discuss coherence, unity/balance, progression with student drawings
B, C=see yesterday period D, watch Gasman 2nd viewing
child development, Christmas

3/12
C=See yesterday.
D=Discuss Hubs, Satellites, and shot Duration from chapter two.
Chapter 2 quiz due Thursday night at midnight. See textbook link onside panel of Wiki.
3/11
B, D=Discuss story, plot, narrative and relate to On the Waterfront. Watch "Gasma" and discuss story and plot differences.
3/6
Show surprise vs. suspense tutorial.
Discuss setting and expressionism.

3/5
Continue watching On the Waterfront/3 and 3 with chosen film terms
Chapter one on-line quiz due by Thursday night midnight. See link and
e-mail to instructor.

Blog response. See link below. Blog one due Tuesday by midnight and blog
two due Thursday night by midnight. Relate to On the Waterfront.

http://filmstudy2013.wikispaces.com/home



3/4
C and D: Continue On the Waterfront

3/1
D=Discuss form. Watch chapter 2 five-minute video: Content vs, Form=define
By using three mediums, produce a piece of art that conveys an assigned theme.
B=Watch content vs form and discuss.

2/28 (half-day)
B, C--Watch Film Analysis video that uses Juno as backdrop.

2/27
Introduce On the Waterfont.

2/26
Finish discussion of "Wasp"
D=Begin On the Waterfront with notes and questions.

2/25
Camera Movement (tilt, pan, crane, dolly or tracking, jib arm, steadicam, handheld)
Zoom vs. Camera Movement
Perspective and focal length
B and C periods: one-page journal about "what you see" on page 57 picture.
D: Watch"Wasp" and take down 6 comments/6 questions. Turn in.

2/15
C period=see yesterday period D
D=Listen to Fleet Foxes "Blue Ridge Mountains" and use lyrics as movie pitch.
Watch Sean Penn's 9-11 film with Ernest Borgnine.
Answer questions:
What is the film saying ?(content)
How is the film saying it ?(form)
How well is the film saying it? (analysis)
We will begin Elia Kazan's On the Waterfront upon return.

2/14
D=Quiz chapter one (1, 7, 9)
camera levels: eye, low, high, extra high (bird's eye), dutch (oblique)
Watch Passengers film short.
B=camera levels, Watch Passengers and free write
What is the film saying?
How is it saying it?
How well is it saying it?
2/13
B-Chapter one quiz (2, 5, 7)
C Chapter two quiz (1, 2, 4)
No homework.

2/7
C, D-Starter: Read page 44 about genre. Watch film short "Razor's Edge." Answer question 8 on page 55 about genre.
Group work answering questions 1-10 on page 52 Questions for Review. These questions will be asked for quiz on Friday morning. You may use journal.
Watch Alejaundo Gonzalez Inarritu 9-11 short. Discuss sound vs. image.
Check films to see list.

February 6
D period-see 2/5
B period-discuss genre
watch Gonzalez 9-11 clip
discuss questions at end of chapter for Friday quiz

February 5
Starter: Discuss Brando picture for shot type and coloring/balance
Cover chapter one. Five film elements: manipulate time and space, lighting, convey real world, complex process, illusion of movement. Show Chaplin (space and time) The Gold Rush (1925) and Spike Lee (light) Do the Right Thing (1989) film clips
Add ten films to To See list.

February 4
Starter-Discuss one film or show that you saw over the weekend. Discuss content/form.
Watch David Bordwell's Constructive (vs. Analytical) Editing piece.
Chapter Four tutorial: Shot Types and Implied Significance
ELS, LS, FS, MLS, MS, CU, ECU
Collect one-page paper: Compare film viewing to poetry reading.
Test shot types while viewing Spam-Ku.
Wiki, e-mail, cover journal, begin reading chapter one for Friday. Answer questions for review in journal as study aide for quiz.

February 1
B and C: Poetry Out Loud
Paper due, one-page: How does viewing a film differ from viewing a poetry reading?Due Monday
e-mail, join Wiki, cover journals
Collect JHC stories.
D period: read Jesus Henry Christ stories in class
Watch Omnibus and write poem.

January 31
No school

January 30
Distribute textbooks and record numbers
Rewatch "Jesus Henry Christ."
Look at mise-en-scene, mise-en-shot, sound, lighting, acting
E-mail teacher
One-page story based on "Jesus Henry Christ"

January 29
"Jesus Henry Christ"

January 25
Introductions
"The Man with a Shovel" by Chauna Craig: How do we use short fiction to create visual story?
"Robot Boy": Analyze film